The Lynx Group

Gastrointestinal Cancer

New Clues to Mismatch Repair and PD-1/PD-L1 Status and Survival in Patients with Gastric or Esophageal Cancer

San Francisco, CA—Understanding the complex relationship between the PD-1 receptor, its ligand 1 (PD-L1), and mismatch repair deficiency (dMMR) status may help to improve treatment outcomes in patients with resectable gastric and esophageal cancer, according to a retrospective tissue-based analysis.

Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Type 2 Therapy in Gastrointestinal Tumors

Federico Longo, MD; Alfredo Carrato, MD, PhD
Medical Oncology Department, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital
Madrid, Spain

Case ReportA 64-year-old woman was examined at our emergency department after a 6-month period of suffering from progressive fatigue, anorexia, significant weight loss, and abdominal pain. She had a medical history of active smoking and mixed anxiety-depressive disorder treated with bromazepam and escitalopram. The patient had a performance status of [ Read More ]

Bevacizumab Wins Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in First-Line Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

An economic analysis of the landmark CALGB/SWOG 80405 study, which compared bevaciz­umab versus cetuximab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, declares bevacizumab the clear winner, as its total cost is $39,000 less than cetuximab. “Chemotherapy plus bevacizumab costs less and achieves very similar survival and quality-adjusted survival as chemotherapy plus [ Read More ]

Adding Radiation to First-Line FOLFOX Reduces Progression of Liver Metastases in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with liver-dominant metastases who received first-line FOLFOX (leucovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin) with or without bevacizu­mab plus selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) compared with FOLFOX with or without bevacizumab, progression-free survival (PFS) in the liver was extended by 7.9 months, according to the results [ Read More ]

Immunotherapy Holds Promise to Extend Survival in GI Cancers

San Francisco, CA—The use of immunotherapy for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers should become a reality in the not-too-distant future. Uncovering the signaling networks within the tumor microenvironment that regulate host immune responses is leading to strategies to alter these responses to treat GI malignancies. Combinations of therapies that [ Read More ]

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