Perspectives on Key Presentations in GI Cancer from ASCO-GI 2022: Part II

Rapid Reactions

Rapid Reactions is a video series that provides commentary from key experts summarizing data released at the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium (ASCO-GI) focused on gastric, gastroesophageal, and esophageal cancer. Please join Minsig Choi, MD, from Stonybrook University Cancer Center, as he discusses the following 3 pivotal presentations from ASCO-GI 2022:

  • Results of the GERCOR NEONIPIGA phase 2 study indicated that neoadjuvant therapy with nivolumab and ipilimumab was feasible and was associated with a high pathologic complete response rate in patients with microsatellite instability/DNA mismatch repair deficiency resectable esophagogastric junction and gastric adenocarcinoma
  • Findings of the phase 2 study of FOLFOX plus nab-paclitaxel indicated that the anthracycline-based triplet regimen was associated with a high response rate and expected toxicities in patients with metastatic or advanced unresectable gastric, gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma
  • Results of the Ni-HIGH study showed that the combination of nivolumab plus trastuzumab and either S-1 or capecitabine plus oxaliplatin was tolerable and demonstrated promising antitumor activity in chemotherapy-naïve patients with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer

Read the Articles Discussed in the Video

  1. Neoadjuvant Nivolumab plus Ipilimumab and Adjuvant Nivolumab in Patients with Localized Microsatellite Instability-High/Mismatch Repair Deficient Gastric Adenocarcinoma: GERCOR NEONIPIGA
  2. FOLFOX plus FOLFOX-A in the Treatment of Metastatic or Advanced Unresectable Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma
  3. Nivolumab plus Trastuzumab with S-1/Capecitabine plus Oxaliplatin for HER2-Positive Advanced Gastric Cancer: The Ni-HIGH Study

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