Letter from the Editor June 2013

Paul Richardson, MD

Uncategorized

Progress in the treatment of hematologic malignancies has been remarkable over the past decade, primarily due to the introduction of targeted agents, a better understanding of prognostic indicators, and new data on biomarker analysis. There is no doubt that these advances have great potential for improving outcomes; however, hematologists and oncologists who seek to provide state-of-the-art therapy for their patients may be challenged by the rapidly shifting paradigm of care. In 2013, a wealth of new data regarding the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, myelodysplastic syndrome, myelofibrosis, and multiple myeloma will be presented at major scientific meetings throughout the world. In this “Faculty Perspectives” newsletter series, we will feature highlights from several of these meetings, along with perspectives from renowned thought leaders in the field, which will provide valuable practice implications for the management of patients with hematologic malignancies.

Sincerely,

Paul Richardson, MD
RJ Corman Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Clinical Director
Jerome Lipper Center for Multiple Myeloma
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Massachusetts

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