May 2014, Vol 3, No 3

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The Full Spectrum of Knowledge Driving Personalized Medicine

Darren Sigal, MD

Letter to Our Readers

Dear Colleague,

One of the fascinating aspects of personalized medicine is the recognition of how each component relates to all other components. Take this month’s “The Last Word” column, where one of healthcare’s premier policy authorities, Kip Piper, weighs in on the impact of the Affordable Care Act on cancer care in this second of a 2-part series. This leads us to reflect on the practical reality of healthcare’s triad of medical, business, and policy forces, intertwined and influencing the process of care. The editors of Personalized Medicine in Oncology (PMO) make certain to bring the whole picture of this process to practicing oncologists:

  • The clinical needs driving drug and device utilization
  • The business and policy context influencing clinical practice
  • The winners and losers in the wake of healthcare reform
  • Clarity of treatment options in a healthcare system undergoing a paradigm shift

Knowledge is power, and PMO is dedicated to increasing oncologists’ power to heal in this changing paradigm. The extraordinary variety of knowledge we organize for our readers helps bridge the gap from drug discovery to real-world practice. We are pleased to have you in our reading community as we open the door to the full spectrum of knowledge driving personalized medicine in cancer.

Sincerely,

Darren Sigal, MD
Scripps Clinic
PMO Board Member

Value-Based Cancer Care - May 15, 2014

Promise of Personalized Care Hinges on Reimbursement Reform: Oncologists Must Lead the Way

The promise of big data-driven personalized healthcare mandates reform of the oncology reimbursement system, suggested Jeffery C. Ward, MD, medical oncologist, Swedish Cancer Institute, Edmonds, WA, in a recent commentary (Ward JC. J Oncol Pract. 2014;10:83-86). Oncologists must take the lead in moving past “medicine’s dark secret” of fee-for-service (FFS) [ Read More ]

Uncategorized - May 15, 2014

Routine Cervical Cancer Screening Warranted Beyond Age 64

Results of a new study investigating the probability of a cervical cancer diagnosis among women aged 65 to 83 years using data from the UK Cervical Screening Call/Recall System indicate that the current practice may need to be changed. The new data show that the odds of such a diagnosis [ Read More ]