The Value of Personalized Medicine in Oncology

Greg Kalemkerian, MD

Letter to Our Readers

Dear Colleague,

Personalized Medicine in Oncology (PMO) organizes the vastly complex forces of personalized medicine into an approachable model of cancer care:

  • Identifying the genetic mutations and biological derangements that drive tumors
  • Translating genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics into real-world clinical strategies
  • Anticipating payers’ increasing demands for prior authorization of biological therapy
  • Interviewing healthcare visionaries in the medical, managed care, and policy sectors
  • Assessing the biological pipeline and its impact on transforming survival expectations

In short, PMO is the practicing oncologists’ survival guide for translating targeted, personalized cancer care from clinical trials to clinical practice. Our goal is to bring clarity to providers on making the transition from conventional to personalized cancer care. The gratifying potential of personalized medicine is only attainable if it is understood by providers. With many new therapies being so rapidly developed, it is challenging for practicing oncologists to keep pace and to discern the true, clinically relevant advances within the field. We thank our readers and supporters because, as a community, we sustain the momentum of personalized cancer care, making it possible to sit back every now and then to take stock of the impact that novel therapies are having on the lives of our patients. We have come a long way in just a few short years, but there are many hurdles yet to overcome, and PMO will continue to serve as our guide to optimizing personalized medical care within our practices.

It is our sincere wish that this journal helps you achieve a new level in providing personalized care to your patients.

Sincerely,

Greg Kalemkerian, MD

University of Michigan
PMO Board Member

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