Mechanism of Action Magnifier – 2016 Desk Reference

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Magnifying Mechanisms of Action: an Exclusive Series to PMO

Dear Colleague,

Welcome to the inaugural edition of our annual Mechanism of Action Magnifier™! The Magnifier series is an exclusive supplement brought to you by the publishers of Personalized Medicine in Oncology (PMO) to delve into the biochemical interaction through which an oncology drug produces its pharmacological effect. Throughout the year, we have published Magnifiers on novel diagnostics and pathways in hope of further enhancing reader learning and improving the ability to care for patients. The current landscape in oncology is a complicated but promising one, in which oncologists and patients can be overwhelmed by options for care. It is our sincere hope that through the pages of PMO and our Magnifier series a more clear understanding of options emerges.

In this issue, we highlight the mechanisms of action (MOA) for various oncology drugs. As oncology therapeutics have become increasingly about molecular targets, the degree to which we focus on MOA has increased in turn. Understanding this process is imperative for oncologists not only for their own knowledge and expectations for outcomes, but is also invaluable to our ability to communicate with patients in order to thoroughly explain the expectations of therapy. This ability to convey in layman’s terms the MOA of a drug can be a comfort to patients as well as empower them as a member of their own care team.

I hope you have benefitted from our Magnifier offerings. If ever there is a topic you would like to have addressed in this series, please contact our Editorial Director at ksiyahian@the-lynx-group.com.

Sincerely,

Al B. Benson III, MD, FACP, FASCO
Coeditor in Chief
Personalized Medicine in Oncology

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