Letter from the Editor June 2013

Paul Richardson, MD

Uncategorized

Progress in the treatment of hematologic malignancies has been remarkable over the past decade, primarily due to the introduction of targeted agents, a better understanding of prognostic indicators, and new data on biomarker analysis. There is no doubt that these advances have great potential for improving outcomes; however, hematologists and oncologists who seek to provide state-of-the-art therapy for their patients may be challenged by the rapidly shifting paradigm of care. In 2013, a wealth of new data regarding the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, myelodysplastic syndrome, myelofibrosis, and multiple myeloma will be presented at major scientific meetings throughout the world. In this “Faculty Perspectives” newsletter series, we will feature highlights from several of these meetings, along with perspectives from renowned thought leaders in the field, which will provide valuable practice implications for the management of patients with hematologic malignancies.

Sincerely,

Paul Richardson, MD
RJ Corman Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Clinical Director
Jerome Lipper Center for Multiple Myeloma
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Massachusetts

FDA Approvals, News & Updates, Web Exclusives - February 5, 2020

Recap of FDA Drug Approvals in 2019

According to the FDA’s “Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) Annual Report: New Drug Therapy Approvals 2019,” the agency approved 48 novel drugs in 2019. Although this number does not approach the record of 59 approvals in 2018, it far surpasses the mere 22 approvals that occurred in 2016.

Stakeholder Perspective - September 28, 2020

Multiple Pathways and Resources for NSCLC Treatment in an Academic Medical Center

In my medical oncology practice at Johns Hopkins, I see approximately 4 patients with nonmetastatic NSCLC per week. Most of these patients are referrals from either pulmonary medicine or thoracic surgery. A patient with early stage disease initially sees a pulmonologist for diagnosis and may then be referred to a thoracic surgeon. The thoracic surgeon may refer the patient to us in medical oncology if there is an indication to enroll the patient in a clinical trial or for systemic therapy. In a community oncology practice, patients tend to go to surgery first and are then referred to the medical oncologist for adjuvant chemotherapy. In academic centers, it is more common for patients to be seen in a multidisciplinary setting.